Scotland set to vote against Brexit bill

  • Scotland set to vote against Brexit bill

Scotland set to vote against Brexit bill

The Scottish Parliament rejected the current Brexit bill, setting up a clash between London and Edinburgh.

The Scottish Parliament voted against British Prime Minister Theresa May's landmark Brexit legislation, setting up a potential constitutional crisis and further complicating the path to an orderly departure.

"I'm pretty sure Donald Trump is a lover of Irn Bru", Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said at an event at Thomson Reuters in London. The U.K. can disregard the vote, but it would be the first time London asserts its dominance over the regional parliament.

An initial proposal a year ago by Britain that devolved powers returning from the European Union after Brexit should initially pass to Westminster was roundly rejected by Welsh and Scottish politicians.

Mr Leonard, speaking on BBC Scotland's Sunday Politics Scotland programme, said: "As there appears to be a breakdown in trust between the two governments, there really needs to be an alternative way found forwards".

Holyrood's approval is not legally necessary for the EU Withdrawal Bill to become law because Westminster can disregard its view.

Britain as a whole voted in June 2016 to leave the European Union, but Scotland voted to remain.

PA Wire  PA Images                   Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons London
PA Wire PA Images Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons London

Both the Scottish and UK Governments claim the door is still open to a deal over 24 devolved powers returning from Brussels, which Whitehall says must be "frozen" at Westminster for up to seven years to protect internal trade after Brexit.

Labour and the Liberal Democrats have been accused of acting as the "midwives" for the breakup of the United Kingdom after they voted with the SNP to reject legislative consent for crucial Brexit legislation in the Scottish Parliament.

He said he felt there were many powers being repatriated from the European Union as a result of Brexit which fall fairly to the devolved parliament.

Theresa May has the power to force the Bill through without getting the consent of Scotland.

Mrs May said the bill meant the devolved governments would still to be able to make all the decisions they can now make after Brexit.

He will call on him come to Scotland and hear "hear the concerns of all parties and to discuss with the Scottish Government and the UK Government any new ideas from any of the parties".

Nicola Sturgeon's government in Edinburgh insists that Holyrood must explicity agree to any changes before they can take effect.