Apple CEO Tim Cook praises Parkland, 'Me Too' activists in commencement speech

  • Apple CEO Tim Cook praises Parkland, 'Me Too' activists in commencement speech

Apple CEO Tim Cook praises Parkland, 'Me Too' activists in commencement speech

Apple CEO Tim Cook turned to a familiar source when it came to offering advice to the class of 2018.

Here, Cook not only urged graduates to leave the world a better place but to also remind them that Apple takes data privacy seriously.

"If you can say, 'we do not take your data, ' there are going to be people who say they feel more comfortable going to Apple than Facebook", Cramer said.

Cook has previously said that because Apple profits from selling its products rather than user information, his company is safe from privacy scandals like the one dogging Facebook.

Cook, however, emphasized at Duke that Apple did things differently, explaining: 'We reject the excuse that getting the most out of technology means trading away your right to privacy'. So we choose a different path: "collecting as little of your data as possible, and being thoughtful and respectful when it's in our care".

"I wouldn't be in this situation", Cook told reporters from Recode and MSNBC in March. "And not at all aligned with the truth", Zuckerberg told Vox.

"Facebook is benefiting off of harvesting and monetizing your data and Apple is just there to help you succeed in life", she said.

In many ways, Cook's address was similar to Steve Jobs' now-famous commencement speech at Stanford University from 2005 titled "How to live before you die". "Steve's vision was that the great idea comes from a restless refusal to accept things as they are".

Apple launched a new privacy section on its website a year ago, in which it boasts about its stance on data protection. The concern for privacy is more than ever and it seems like the companies are experiencing a hard time fending off these attacks.

"At Apple, we believe privacy is a fundamental human right", the site says, adding that "every Apple product is designed from the ground up" to protect information, including calls, emails, messages, and internet history.

In 2014, meanwhile, hackers were able to access private photographs belonging to celebrities before posting them online.

"Fearless like the students of Parkland, Florida\, who refuse to be silent about the epidemic of gun violence and have rallied millions to their cause", Cook said.