Iran's Foreign Minister in China to rescue nuclear deal

  • Iran's Foreign Minister in China to rescue nuclear deal

Iran's Foreign Minister in China to rescue nuclear deal

Iran said it would remain committed to the deal without Washington if Tehran achieved its goals - namely being protected from sanctions against key sectors of its economy such as oil - in cooperation with other countries that have signed up to the agreement.

Under the deal signed in Vienna with six world powers - the US, UK, France, Germany, Russia, China and the European Union - Iran scaled back its uranium enrichment programme and promised not to pursue nuclear weapons in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions.

According to reports by Iranian news agencies, Rouhani, in issuing his orders on May 12, underlined the importance of securing Iran's economic interests.

The trip comes after U.S. President Donald Trump announced on May 8 that Washington was walking away from the agreement, officially called the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA).

Iran's leaders pushed Sunday to preserve the nuclear deal with world powers after the United States pulled out of it, with its foreign minister embarking on a diplomatic tour to China demanding that the European signatories remain faithful to the accord.

After their meeting, Zarif and Wang hailed the "comprehensive strategic partnership" between their countries, with the Chinese minister saying: "I hope and believe that these visits to multiple countries will. help protect Iran's legitimate national interests and peace and stability in the region".

Iran has said it would remain in the JCPOA for now, pending negotiations with the other signatories in the coming weeks before making a final decision on its future role in the agreement.

Before leaving, Zarif published a government statement on his Twitter page, slamming Trump's "extremist administration" for abandoning "an accord recognized as a victory of diplomacy by the worldwide community".

It reiterated that Iran was preparing to resume "industrial-scale" uranium enrichment "without any restrictions" unless Europe provided solid guarantees that it could maintain trade ties despite renewed USA sanctions.

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said last week he is highly doubtful that Europe will provide the "real guarantees" needed for Iran to stay in the nuclear deal.

Media captionWhat is the Iran nuclear deal?

Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has called the USA withdrawal "impudent" and "worthless".

Iran's main concern is that renewed US sanctions will have a far-reaching impact on the willingness of non-American companies and banks to deal with Iran, crippling its trade, oil exports and an already strained economy.