Security increased at UH Ahuja Fertility Center after egg, embryo freezer malfunction

  • Security increased at UH Ahuja Fertility Center after egg, embryo freezer malfunction

Security increased at UH Ahuja Fertility Center after egg, embryo freezer malfunction

University Hospitals, in Cleveland, has apologised following the fault at one of its fertility clinics last weekend.

There appears to have been an equipment failure at a long-term storage tank containing liquid nitrogen at the University Hospitals Fertility Center, NBC News reported.

Patti DePompei, president of University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital and MacDonald Women's Hospital, called the situation "absolutely devastating". The viability of the eggs and embryos is unknown, the facility said in a statement. "Obviously the situation that occurred here is devastating for the families involved, and it's devastating for. our staff", DePompei tells NBC News.

According to University Hospitals, none of the eggs and embryos impacted by the partial thaw will be destroyed. We are committed to getting answers and working with patients individually to address their concerns. An American Society for Reproductive Medicine rep says nothing like this has ever happened at a USA fertility clinic.

A call center has also been set up to arrange personal meetings or calls with physicians. There has been a temperature fluctuation that may have damaged the stored eggs they said.

In comments underneath the video message, people expressed frustration and heartbreak at the potential loss of the embryos and eggs, which represented not only a significant financial and medical commitment, but the hope of expanding families. In order to determine whether or not the eggs and embryos are still viable, they have to be completely thawed, but they can not be refrozen after that.

"We are working very very carefully to determine how we can best support them through the process", DePompei said, while saying it was unclear whether fertility procedure fees for the affected patients will be waived.

Eggs are frozen in order to postpone pregnancy.

The average cost of fertility treatment can be around $10,000 so the financial impact is expected to be significant. "We will work with our member clinics to help them take any steps needed to ensure such an event never happens again". According to the latest figures from the ARSM, more than 6,200 women froze their eggs in 2015.