Canadian Economy Adds Jobs in February, but Full-Time Positions Shrink

  • Canadian Economy Adds Jobs in February, but Full-Time Positions Shrink

Canadian Economy Adds Jobs in February, but Full-Time Positions Shrink

Lethbridge region was one of only 2 economic regions in the province where the unemployment rate went up in February.

St. John's, Newfoundland had the highest rate in the country at 8.7%, while Vancouver had the lowest at 3.9%. Saskatoon's unemployment rate fell from 7.4 per cent to 6.9, while Regina's ticked up from 4.4 to 4.9 per cent. The unemployment rate declined by 0.1 percentage points to 5.8%.

The numbers are in and Windsor's unemployment rate has notched up a few points.

Statistics Canada's latest labour force survey also says the job gains in February were driven by an increase of 50,300 public-sector jobs.

Across B.C., only Victoria saw a hike in unemployment, with its rate up half a per cent to 4.4 in February, compared with 3.9 the month earlier.

By industry, the goods-producing sector shed 10,400 positions last month, led by a decline of 16,500 jobs in manufacturing, while the services industries added 25,900 jobs.

Since October, Ottawa-Gatineau has added 15,100 jobs, with the region now employing some 734,300 residents. Average hourly wages for permanent employees rose by 3.1 percent from last February, down from the 3.3 percent year-over-year increase in January. But economists say the positive labour market signs will not be enough for the Bank of Canada to raise interest rates. It said future decisions will continue to be guided by incoming data, such as the economy's sensitivity to higher rates, the evolution of economic capacity and changes to wage growth and inflation. Porter, who believes a year of data is needed to get a proper reading on the impact of the minimum wage.

The Ontario jobless rate remained steady at 5.5%.