Cheerleaders may have been exposed to Mumps at national competition in Dallas

  • Cheerleaders may have been exposed to Mumps at national competition in Dallas

Cheerleaders may have been exposed to Mumps at national competition in Dallas

In the wake of discovering that somebody with the sickness had gone to the National Cheerleaders Association All-Star National Championship, health officials sent a letter cautioning about conceivable presentation, a representative for the Department of State Health Services, Chris Van Deusen, disclosed to The Washington Post.

A person with the virus attended the National Cheerleaders Association All-Star National Championship in Fort Worth, which drew crowds from 39 states, between February 23 and February 25.

The NCA said in a tweet that 23,655 athletes, 2,600 coaches from 39 states and nine countries attended the competition in Dallas. Symptoms are swollen and painful salivary glands, fever, muscle aches, weakness and fatigue, loss of appetite, and pain while chewing or swallowing.

A total of 130 mumps infections were reported in 25 states between January 1-27, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health officials advise people never to share glasses, utensils, cigarettes or other items, as that could also spread the virus.

Those symptoms usually appear 16 to 18 days after the infection, and individuals can begin spreading the virus two days before showing symptoms.

Many people do not have exhibit any symptoms. Infected people without symptoms may still be able to transmit the virus.

The CDC says the MMR vaccine is "very safe" and about 88 percent effective with two doses in your system.

The mumps vaccine was created in 1967 and was mostly eradicated until a trend arose in Texas in 2016 with 191 cases reported, according to TDSHS. However, pregnant women or people who are immunocompromised should not receive the MMR vaccine.