Deutsche Bank gets subpoena from Mueller on Trump accounts

  • Deutsche Bank gets subpoena from Mueller on Trump accounts

Deutsche Bank gets subpoena from Mueller on Trump accounts

It was reported earlier that as part of his probe into possible collusion between Russian Federation and the Trump campaign, Mr Mueller asked Deutsche Bank to share data on accounts held by Mr Trump and his family.

A US official with knowledge of Mueller's probe said one reason for the subpoenas was to find out whether Deutsche Bank may have sold some of Trump's mortgage or other loans to Russian state development bank VEB or other Russian banks that now are under USA and European Union sanctions.

Then not long after that, Trump attorney Jay Sekulow confirmed to Reuters that there was no Trump finances subpoena sent to Deutsche Bank.

Mr Trump has repeatedly denied any collusion with Russian Federation, calling the allegations a "witch hunt".

In addition, the Justice Department has spent $3.5 million to support the investigation, though the special counsel's office says that money would have been spent anyway if Mueller had not been appointed. The president's financial records could potentially show whether Trump owes or has received money from suspects connected to Russian Federation.

"I think that's a violation", Mr. Trump told the paper.

Donald Trump's personal banking information has formally been turned over to Robert Mueller, the special prosecutor who is investigating whether the president's campaign conspired with the Kremlin during the 2016 presidential election. "Look, this is about Russian Federation". Deutsche Bank spokesman Chalie Olivier told Newsweek the bank declined to comment on the matter.

Deutsche Bank has previously rejected similar demands, citing privacy laws.

Trump had liabilities of at least $130 million to Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, a unit of the German bank, according to a federal financial disclosure form released in June by the U.S. Office of Government Ethics. He has announced criminal charges against four people so far, including Trump's former national security advisor, Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty to lying to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In 2008 Trump sued the bank to get out of $40 million in guarantees he had made them on his loan.

So far, the special counsel has charged four people as part of the investigation including Manafort and Flynn.

In October, Manafort pleaded not guilty to charges including conspiracy to launder money and conspiracy against the United States.