Why is this Japanese company offering their nonsmoking employees paid leaves?

  • Why is this Japanese company offering their nonsmoking employees paid leaves?

Why is this Japanese company offering their nonsmoking employees paid leaves?

It is up to the employer to put in place their rules about smoking at work.

So far, 30 of the company's 120 employees have taken advantage of the scheme. The situation was compounded by the fact that smokers often ventured down from the company's office on the 29th floor to a smoking area in the basement.

But according to a survey by Expedia Japan in conducted 2015, the average Japanese worker used only 39 percent of their annual paid leave.

Some employees smoke several times a day which led to complaints, but given that much of the conversations during these breaks are related to work, the company decided it would be better to compensate non-smokers, instead of taking action against those who smoke.

Since the start of the programme on September 1, four employees out of 42 smokers have kicked the habit.

A smoker in Tokyo.

"As the country that introduced the smoking ban we should encourage Irish based companies to do the same".

"I hope to encourage employees to quit smoking through incentives rather than penalties or coercion", Piala Inc.

Around 21.7 percent of adults smoke cigarettes, according to the World Health Organization. The company, after investigating, agreed-and CEO Takao Asuka set the new policy.

Now, all non-smoking staff at the company will be given an additional six days' worth of holidays each year.

"Moves to quit smoking have spread among staff working under my supervision", he said. These initiatives appear to be an attempt to "tidy up" the Japanese capital ahead of the 2020 Summer Olympics, which Tokyo will be hosting.

A man smokes at an "izakaya" restaurant or pub in Tokyo, Japan March 15, 2017.