NH attorney general: Investigation into three Dartmouth professors involves 'sexual misconduct' allegations

  • NH attorney general: Investigation into three Dartmouth professors involves 'sexual misconduct' allegations

NH attorney general: Investigation into three Dartmouth professors involves 'sexual misconduct' allegations

Three psychology professors at Dartmouth College are being investigated for alleged sexual misconduct, authorities announced Tuesday.

According to the AG, three Dartmouth College professors were put on paid leave with restricted access to campus.

The New Hampshire attorney general's office, "along with the Grafton County Attorney's Office, the New Hampshire State Police, the Grafton County Sheriff's Office, and the Hanover Police Department, will be conducting a joint criminal investigation into this matter", the statement reads.

MacDonald said that his office spoke to Dartmouth College about the suspensions after they were reported in "The Dartmouth".

Last week, local law enforcement officials said they had no knowledge of a college internal investigation into "serious misconduct" until it appeared in a campus newspaper.

Julie Moore, a lawyer for Heatherton, told the paper that her client's charges were unrelated to the other two professors and denied that he had broken any policies or had sexual relations with any student.

Dartmouth College President Phil Hanlon confirmed the criminal probe in an email to students on Tuesday.

The professors did not immediately respond to email messages seeking comment.

The College is cooperating with law enforcement officials, Hanlon wrote.

All three professors are faculty of the college's Psychological and Brain Sciences Department. The attorney general's office subsequently learned from Dartmouth that the investigations were tied to sexual misconduct, the statement notes. Dartmouth College also pledged to work with investigators to ensure the safety and well-being of all members of their community. "At this time, we have no basis to conclude that there is a threat to the general public".

Heatherton and Kelley authored a 2012 study on how images of food and sex affect the brain, and Whalen assisted in the study, The Times reported. An automatic response from Heatherton's university email account says he's "on sabbatical" and will not be monitoring the account "until September 2018".