Chinese runaway space station will crash to Earth within months, expert warns

  • Chinese runaway space station will crash to Earth within months, expert warns

Chinese runaway space station will crash to Earth within months, expert warns

While China accepted that Tianging 1 was out of its control, Tiangong 2, was launched in September 2016.

The massive Tiangong-1 satellite, launched in 2011, lost radio connection with China's space agency, and China has admitted it will fall to Earth.

However, the Chinese officials confirmed in 2016 that they had lost control of the Tiangong-1 and it would probably crash to Earth. China's space agency has since notified the United Nations that it expects Tiangong-1 to come down between October 2017 and April 2018.

Fragments as heavy as 220 lbs. could make impact with the planet, Harvard University astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell told the Guardian last week. Even slight changes in atmospheric conditions can alter the landing site "from one continent to the next", McDowell told the Guardian.

"You really can't steer these things", Dowell said. This way, they would demonstrate the efforts of China to turn into a space superpower. Not knowing when it's going to come down translates as not knowing where it's going to come down'.

The lab named Tiangong 1, meaning "heavenly palace", was launched in September 2011 and after over six years, is all set to hit the Earth.

"The probability of endangering and causing damage to aviation and ground activities is very low", China wrote in the memo. Also, China's first female astronaut, Liu Yang, visited the space station in 2012.

More than a decade earlier, NASA's first space station, Skylab, broke up over western Australia.

What we know for sure is that Tiangong-1 is slowly falling from space and that soon it would be dipped into more dense reaches of Earth's atmosphere - which will produce a faster falling.

The vessels each weighed about 20 tons, debris from which rained on Capitán Bermúdez in Argentina. China is also now observing the re-entry process of the Tiangong-1 and guaranteed to give updates through enhancing monitoring and forecasting.

Also, NASA's enormous 77-metric ton Skylab space station came hurtling to Earth in an nearly completely uncontrolled descent in 1979, with some large pieces landing outside Perth in Western Australia.