YouTube Now Banning Gun Modification Videos

  • YouTube Now Banning Gun Modification Videos

YouTube Now Banning Gun Modification Videos

Following the deadly Las Vegas shooting that involved a firearm containing a bump stock, YouTube has banned videos that show how to modify rifles so that they contain this particular feature. Yet hours after the announcement, the site still hosted numerous videos showing how to install and use the devices.

"We have long had a policy against harmful and risky content", a YouTube spokesperson told the Telegraph.

The Las Vegas shooting has compelled YouTube to take action not just against bump stock installation videos but also against videos that promote conspiracy theories related to the tragedy. Reports reveal that Paddock had converted his gun into an automatic weapon through "bump stock" devices, which only cost about $100.

Gunman Stephen Paddock used a bump stock in the October 1 shooting in Las Vegas, which left at least 59 dead and more than 500 people injured.

Among the videos now being targeted are those showing how to adapt semi-automatic rifles with bump fire stocks, an accessory which uses a rifle's recoil to bounce it between the shooter's shoulder and the trigger finger-allowing a semiautomatic weapon to simulate automatic rapid-burst fire.

There might be some backlash to YouTube's changes, whether it be by gun-supporters, or those who believe that YouTube is trying to censor the internet, but regardless it seems that this is the new policy so we guess you guys will just have to get used to it. "They're removing all SlideFire videos and issuing account strikes to all content creators who have them".

However, the videos regarding the do-it-yourself modification have been taken off, and could not be found in search.

This is not the first time that tech companies have been scrutinized over material promoted on their websites.

The onus on preventing attacks is surprisingly being laid on tech companies and the reason for this is the availability of information and substances freely, which empowers individuals to create their own weapons - a domain that would have in the past belonged to law enforcement agencies.