Vehicle sales plunge following waning consumer confidence and uncertainty surrounding diesel

  • Vehicle sales plunge following waning consumer confidence and uncertainty surrounding diesel

Vehicle sales plunge following waning consumer confidence and uncertainty surrounding diesel

The figures, by the Society for Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT), showed 426,170 new units were regustered in September, down 9.3 per cent on the year before.

The SMMT said that there were 426,170 new vehicle registrations last month.

Its chief executive, Mike Hawes, pictured, said manufacturers' scrappage schemes are proving popular, but added: "September is always a barometer of the health of the United Kingdom new vehicle market so this decline will cause considerable concern".

Although this marked the sixth consecutive monthly fall the SMMT said the decline last month is particularly concerning as September is seen as "a barometer of the health of the new vehicle market".

Registrations fell by 9.3% during September 2017 compared to 2016, with SMMT citing economic and political uncertainty and "confusion" over air quality plans as fuelling a decline in consumer confidence.

The disappointing data were also exacerbated by ongoing confusion over air quality plans, the SMMT said.

A total of 45,906 new cars have been sold in Northern Ireland so far this year, down more than 5% on last year.

Diesel vehicle sales slumped by more than 20% in September, as British drivers continue to shun them in the wake of recent emission scandals.

However, petrol auto sales declined 1.2% diesel sales fell for the sixth consecutive month, skidding 21.7% lower in September.

The SMMT had been expecting an annual decline because previous years were strong, but it now looks as though that drop may be bigger than expected, a spokeswoman said.

The government has announced plans to ban the sale of all conventional diesel and petrol cars by 2040 in a bid to meet European Union limits on harmful nitrogen dioxide pollution.

He noted that a auto is usually the second-largest big-ticket item for consumers, after a property. The biggest declines were seen at opposite ends of the market with both luxury saloons and superminis falling -36.4% and 21.2% respectively.

Private registrations were -8.8%, with fleet also showing a decline at -10.1% YOY representing 47.0% of registrations vs. 47.5% previous year. Sales of pick-ups and heavier van sales rose slightly. It also said that a lack of public understanding on air quality schemes was undermining the sale of diesel cars and efforts to cut pollution by promoting modern low-emissions vehicles.

The number of new cars sold in Britain has fallen drastically due to uncertainty over Brexit and fears in the auto finance market that easy credit might be fueling a credit bubble.