Microsoft acquires SwiftKey in support of re-inventing productivity ambition

  • Microsoft acquires SwiftKey in support of re-inventing productivity ambition

Microsoft acquires SwiftKey in support of re-inventing productivity ambition

But when it comes to the "completion" of Redmond's Word Flow iOS keyboard "experiment", there's nothing left to do, explain or clarify. The arc-shaped keyboard can be moved to side as well.

This popular Microsoft Garage project is terminated effective immediately, and you can no longer download or even find the "blazing fast" keyboard product in Apple's App Store.

But, like with other Microsoft Garage endeavors, that is not always enough to keep it alive.

Do you have a favorite third-party keyboard? There were plans to "integrate SwiftKey technology with our Guinness World Record Word Flow technology for Windows" but ended up bringing Word Flow features into SwiftKey instead. Those are impressive results for an app that launched initially on Android in 2010 and arrived on iOS less than two years ago. Word Flow combined predictive capabilities, also found on SwiftKey, one-handed mode, custom backgrounds and search functions for things like GIFs and restaurants.

Unlike Word Flow, neither of these keyboards will squeeze to one side for one-handed typing (for that you'll need Fleksy or Minuum). The company had earlier gone through experimenting and assessing several options before zeroing in on the SwiftKey keyboard. The company spent a reported $250 million when it purchased SwiftKey, which was best known for its keyboard apps on iOS and Android.