Ways the Senate Health Care Bill Would Hurt Women

He accepts that though a significant step, "ACA was not ideal, nor could it be the end of our efforts - and that if Republicans could put together a plan that is demonstrably better than the improvements we made to our health care system, that covers as many people at less cost, I would gladly and publicly support it".

Critics pounced after the Senate released its long-awaited bill to dismantle President Barack Obama's health care law on Thursday, saying its proposed cuts to Medicaid could be disastrous for the roughly 3.6 million Florida residents who rely on the program.

Cruz said the bill should allow individuals to purchase health insurance across state lines, which would increase competition and lower costs. "The Senate bill may be even meaner."McConnell said Democrats chose not to help frame the bill."I regret that our Democratic friends made clear early on that they did not want to work with us in a serious, bipartisan way to address the Obamacare status quo".

Sen. Susan Collins of ME reiterated her opposition to language blocking federal money for Planned Parenthood, which many Republicans oppose because it provides abortions.

Marco Rubio of Florida said he will "decide how to vote on health care on the basis of how it impacts Florida". "These cuts are going to either mean coverage for fewer people or fewer services", says Dr. Michelle Moniz, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of MI.

His presentation on Thursday of the Senate's health care measure to Republican colleagues - after the White House and key lobbyists got a peek the night before - was met with something other than unbridled enthusiasm.

"This bill will result in higher costs, less care and millions of Americans will lose their health insurance, particularly through Medicaid", Schumer said. Now, Haywood urges the Senate to "reject this bill and begin anew".

The legislation met a wall of opposition from Democrats and initial skepticism among some Republicans, leaving Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell a narrow path to passage. So it is possible that Mr. McConnell views the potential failure of a hastily written health care bill as an eventual boon. A week or so, assuming a major vote before the July 4 recess, appears even worse a rush to get a health care financing bill, but not necessarily a bill that's good for health care for many Americans.

And they would bar people from using tax credits to buy policies that pay for abortion, and also block Planned Parenthood from getting any money from Medicaid for a year.

"We have to act", McConnell said on the Senate floor Thursday, "because Obamacare is a direct attack on the middle class, and American families deserve better than its failing status quo". The Senate Republicans' plan puts a lid on that by rolling back the Obama-era expansion of the program and then granting states a set amount of money for each person enrolled.

Caroline Pearson, a senior vice president of the consulting firm Avalare Health, said the Senate subsidies would be smaller than Obama's because they're keyed to the cost of a bare-bones plan and because additional help now provided for deductibles and copayments would eventually be discontinued.

Still, the bill unveiled by Senate GOP leaders Thursday is even worse in some ways than the frightful bill the House narrowly approved in May. It would maintain Obamacare's ban on allowing insurers to charge higher premiums to those with pre-existing conditions.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - Governors in several states that opted to expand Medicaid are wary of the Senate Republican plan to end the added federal funding for it within seven years. Both the House and Senate would have to vote again on a final version before sending it to President Donald Trump for signature.

"If you want to have this debate here and now we're willing to have it", Steineke said.

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said under the House bill, 23 million fewer people would have coverage by 2026. Cassidy said such a plan would be funded at $50-billion over five years.