Travel ban critics say Trump is hurting his case

  • Travel ban critics say Trump is hurting his case

Travel ban critics say Trump is hurting his case

Trump's original response to Khan's statement drew criticism for wording that suggested the mayor was saying there was no reason to be alarmed by the attack itself.

Despite the careful efforts of his team to characterize the executive order as a "temporary pause", Trump is calling it like he's sees it.

Those comments came back to haunt him by the time he became president in January, after the courts halted his initial order which banned travel from seven majority-Muslim countries and indefinitely halted entry to Syrian refugees, calling it unconstitutional.

President Donald Trump has tweeted about his travel ban, again contradicting his White House aides.

"We don't need the help but will take it!" "It makes it harder to argue this is not a Muslim ban, and more importantly, it makes it harder to argue that the president's statements should be irrelevant".

Trump tweeted out today saying: "That's right, we need a TRAVEL BAN for certain risky countries, not some politically correct term that won't help us protect our people!"

"That's right, we need a TRAVEL BAN for certain risky countries, not some politically correct term that won't help us protect our people!", Trump's tweet read.

The revised order would require a 90-day halt from many people seeking to enter the USA from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen - all countries that Congress and the administration of former President Barack Obama identified as having connections to terrorism.

Meanwhile on Monday, White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders, answering questions from reporters about why Trump was publicly contradicting his aides, did her best to dodge the issue, telling reporters that Trump "isn't concerned with what you call it", and that he was only anxious about protecting Americans.

US President Trump had on Monday urged for a "much tougher version" of his travel ban. His Twitter missive notwithstanding, Sanders insisted Trump "isn't concerned with what you call it", only with protecting Americans.

George Conway, the husband of Kellyanne Conway, a counselor to the president, and an attorney who turned down a top Justice Department position last week, reacted on Twitter, a medium he rarely uses. Still, she said he'd signed the revised ban "for the purposes of expediency" and wasn't considering a third version of the ban. He ended his show by thanking Trump for watching the program. It needs a compelling case to win a certain number of votes in order to be heard in the Supreme Court.