Theresa May Wants Answers About The London Apartment Tower Fire

  • Theresa May Wants Answers About The London Apartment Tower Fire

Theresa May Wants Answers About The London Apartment Tower Fire

Activists and local residents held demonstrations at the borough's town hall, London's Oxford Street, the United Kingdom home office, the BBC, and the prime minister's official residence at Number 10 Downing Street to vent their frustrations.

The top cop said: "The investigation is a police investigation".

The protesters chanted: "We want justice", "bring them out" and "shame on you". A larger crowd of people remained outside.

"What I'm now absolutely focused on is ensuring that we get that support on the ground".

"The local community feels their grief has been made worse by the lack of information about their missing family members and friends", he wrote.

Prime Minister Theresa May, who has faced criticism for failing to meet survivors when she visited the scene on Thursday, has ordered a full public inquiry into the disaster in response to mounting anger that the fire might have been preventable.

Fire engulfs the 24-story Grenfell Tower in London in the early hours of June 14. The death toll is still expected to rise substantially.

But when she was asked in an interview on Newsnight on Friday night about whether she had misread the public mood, she sidestepped the question.

A cause of the blaze has yet to be determined, but a malfunctioning refrigerator located on the fourth floor is being eyed by investigators.

Tower residents and many others in the area are still struggling to come to terms with what they have seen and lived through. They are furious that people still are missing and that the local government hasn't done enough to help them in the aftermath.

May eventually did visit the hospital and met with victims.

On the figure of 58, he said: "I really hope it won't, but it may increase", while adding that "it might be that some of those are safe and well", and for some reason, had not yet made themselves known to the police. Some jumped to their deaths rather than face the flames, and witnesses reported seeing small children thrown from the tower by their families in a desperate bid to save them.

However, Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson took to Facebook to attack Labour politicians for "political game playing", defending his record regarding the fire service as mayor of London between 2008-2016.

He said police had started a criminal investigation but there was nothing to suggest "that the fire had been started deliberately".

Meanwhile, the police have said that some of the dead, from the devastating blaze may never be identified, as officers warned that the painful process of retrieving the victims could take months.

"Sadly we do not expect there to be any survivors", Cundy said.

Police have so far recovered 16 bodies and the first victim has been formally identified as 23-year-old Mohammed Alhajali.