Driving test overhaul to include sat nav use

  • Driving test overhaul to include sat nav use

Driving test overhaul to include sat nav use

Mr Jones said: "Ensuring the driving test is relevant in the 21st century - for example, the introduction of sat navs, will go a long way towards doing this".

The reforms are being introduced despite concerns that they could erode motoring skills and make drivers too reliant on gadgets.

Other changes will include scrapping the "reverse around the corner" manoeuvre and getting drivers to show they can drive into and reverse out of a parking space.

These changes are created to make the test more reflective of real-life driving, and can be seen as a positive evolution of the licensing process.

Road traffic collisions accounts for over a quarter of all deaths for those between age 15 and 19.

Transport minister Andrew Jones said despite the United Kingdom having some of the safest roads in the world, the government was "always looking to make them safer".

Around half of drivers own a sat nav and 70% of respondents support the DVSA's desire to teach drivers to use them safely.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency, which runs the tests and approves instructors, said the shake up was aimed at keeping pace with modern driving and focusing on more-needed skills.

The Independent has contacted Brake for comment on the driving test changes.

Half of drivers use a sat nav and there have always been calls for the test to be updated to reflect the changing way people use the roads.

About 50 per cent of auto drivers own a sat nav, and plenty more will use Google maps on their phone, and the DVSA (we checked, not the DVLA) chief executive Gareth Llewellyn said it is "vital that the driving test keeps up to date with the new vehicle technology and the areas where new drivers face the greatest risk once they've passed their test".

One in five driving tests will not include the sat nav testing component, the DVSA says.

National Associations Strategic Partnership (NASP) chairman Lynne Barrie, said: "NASP welcomes the changes to the practical driving test and believes the key to safer drivers is better training and preparation. We're moving with technology and the technology that new drivers will be using". The changes which will take effect in December are overdue.

Gareth Llewellyn, DVSA chief executive, said: "It's vital that the test keeps up to date with new vehicle technology and the areas where new drivers face the greatest risk once they've passed their test".

"We know that new drivers are a higher risk on the roads, therefore we need to better prepare them for real-world driving", he said.