Tesla Powerwall batteries could be the solution to energy woes and blackouts

  • Tesla Powerwall batteries could be the solution to energy woes and blackouts

Tesla Powerwall batteries could be the solution to energy woes and blackouts

Thanks to stepped-up production out of Tesla's new Gigafactory in Nevada, Musk said it could be achieved within 100 days and that if this deadline was not achieved the company would provide the equipment for free.

The CEO of Tesla made the offer on Twitter, and has been talking figures with Mike Cannon-Brookes, the co-founder of Australian software maker Atlassian, who first asked how serious Mr Musk was.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has promised to fix a problem you might not know exists. He has said that his company would build a 100MW battery storage farm in the state, and that if the farm is not set up within 100 days, he will hand it over for free.

Cannon-Brookes received a reply less than a day later.

But he says Australian energy companies are also trialling alternative means of storage including "pumped hydro", a method singled out by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in a recent speech.

Cannon-Brookes reckons he needs a week to get around the politics and funding in his home nation, but still attempted to secure a "mates rates" deal with the Tesla mastermind.

South Australia has had problems with its energy lately.

It is also understood to have received a range of proposals from Australian and global competitors to Tesla to build battery storage systems.

"When you've got companies like Tesla and others who have a track record of delivering some interesting outcomes you would be insane to write it off", Mr Wood said.

Elon Musk, like many other tech industry leaders, has been slammed by foes of President Trump for being part of the White House's business advisory council.

"Finding the right way for governments and their agencies to engage with proposals like this I think this going to be a tricky, challenging and worth doing", he said. "$250/kWh at the pack level for 100MWh+ systems".

Late on Friday local time Mr Musk offered Mr Cannon-Brookes a system for $US250 per kilowatt hour of capacity - about half the pre-discount price quoted by Tesla executives in Melbourne on Thursday.

"South Australian government "is clearly committed to a smart, quick solution", Mr Musk tweeted".