Hoosiers leaving for Women's March on Washington

Local designer travels to Washington DC for Donald Trump's Presidential Inauguration, shares fashion choices.

Volunteers are making signs for the Women's March in cities around the United States on Saturday, including Reno, Las Vegas and South Lake Tahoe.

Exactly, right?! After all, these days, the more action you take, versus just lamenting on social media yet doing nothing else, the better. Though students will be attending, Altizer said she has been receiving RSVPs from the greater Knoxville community. "The women's movement isn't going anywhere", said Pizzoferrato.

"(Trump) has made comments that are offensive and that we can classify as hate speech - which is a form of violence against women", Dogra says.

Though many in the area can not make it to the D.C. march, Fisher said, at least one Bemidji woman is making the trip and will participate in the national event.

Some organizers at the national and local levels have been careful not to label the rallies "anti-Trump" or "protests".

"We want to make sure to take a strong stand on human rights and women's rights, and personally I feel like this administration hasn't given a huge indication that our rights as women will be protected".

March organizers said in a statement posted to their website that participants will unite to end violence and promote rights for women, LGBT people, workers, people of color, people with disabilities and immigrants. But she says it won't stop her from voicing her opinion. She said she has not been "politically driven" or prone to protest because she always had faith in the system. "We're not going back", says Martin.

Originally planned to begin at Lord & Taylor, the march will now begin at the south side of the Westfield train station at 11 a.m. Earlier in January, New York Magazine's Jonathan Chait went to Twitter to express discontent with the march called "Women's March" because it seemed to exclude anyone that doesn't identify as a woman.