Turns Out Pasta Isn't Fattening - and Can Actually Help You Lose Weight

  • Turns Out Pasta Isn't Fattening - and Can Actually Help You Lose Weight

Turns Out Pasta Isn't Fattening - and Can Actually Help You Lose Weight

There is something else we should probably bring to your attention, though - the study was carried out on people who consumed a Mediterranean diet alongside their daily pasta dose.

Contrary to what many believe, pasta consumption is not fattening, says study first author George Pounis.

Many studies have already demonstrated that the Mediterranean diet is one of the healthiest nutritional regimens. Dr. Gunter Kuhnle of the University of Reading says that while the Neuromed Institute's data is sound, "it is important to understand that pasta intake can not be seen in isolation but that it is part of a dietary pattern". A Mediterranean diet, which is rich in olive oil, fruit, fish, vegetables and whole grains, has been found to by previous studies to be better for overall health, a lower chance for heart disease and strokes, and serve as some protection against Alzheimer's disease. The researchers did not say how much pasta is enough, but one thing is for sure, consuming too much can cause negative health consequences. Participants of the study were only able to report a serving size of three ounces, leaving us to wonder whether the study would yield the same results at a random sampling of tables at Carbone.

Journal Reference: Association of pasta consumption with body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio: results from Moli-sani and INHES studies. The best diet is, as always, variety and balance, and this is exactly the case with pasta, Iacoviello concludes.

The dough is often considered a factor associated with gaining weight and obesity, which is why many people limit their consumption of pasta.

The Mediterranean diet is modeled off of foods commonly eaten in countries on the Mediterranean Sea.

Yummy pastas have been a favourite food for every other kid and also for a few adults and elderly who love to gorge on it often. However, just because pasta is good for your health, it doesn't mean you should eat it recklessly. Out of those, 14,402 participants were part of the general population of the Molise region (Moli-sani cohort), while the remaining 8964 participants were recruited from the Italian Nutrition & Health Survey (INHES).

Licia Iacoviello, Head of the Laboratory of Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology at Neuromed Institute, said pasta is basic component of Italian Mediterranean tradition.

"In this context, it is however important to understand that pasta intake can not be seen in isolation but that it is part of a dietary pattern".

The study has shown that carbohydrates have been unfairly demonized and with other foods such as eggs, butter and salt, these foods are slowly starting to be redeemed.