Microsoft demonstrates new hologram tech with Holoportation

  • Microsoft demonstrates new hologram tech with Holoportation

Microsoft demonstrates new hologram tech with Holoportation

You have to have Microsoft's bulky augmented reality device strapped to your face to see the holograms. But there's a new thing Microsoft Research's Interactive 3D Technologies (I3D) team has developed with the HoloLens, and, uh, it's insane. While Izadi was being recorded in person, the other people who joined him (including his daughter) were displayed as digital renderings while being recorded in another room.

In a magical new video, Microsoft blurs the line between science fiction and reality with an extraordinary demonstration of the Microsoft HoloLens.

Another obvious use of holoportation technology would be in the business world.

Whether it actually will go on sale remains to be seen however. The images are recorded by 3D cameras throughout the room then the footage is compressed together and transmitted to the other person(s).

There are still key parts of human interaction that are missing.

To get the hologram to work you have to pop on Microsoft's HoloLens Headset, while the other person stands near a special camera to capture their movements. But there are some limitations, such as the narrow field-of-view of the HoloLens.

That means people who holoport into conversations could look a bit like they're floating in midair.

The HoloLens researchers, one a holograph, high-five in VR.

As you can see, it requires a bunch of hardware, and because of this, we probably won't see this available for consumers in a while, but we'll probably find out more about HoloLens at Microsoft Build, its giant developer conference, that kicks off next week.